Wednesday, January 17, 2018

No More Spreadsheets: The New Paradigm in Asset Strategy Man - Reliabilityweb: A Culture of Reliability

No More Spreadsheets: The New Paradigm in Asset Strategy Man - Reliabilityweb: A Culture of Reliability

No More Spreadsheets: The New Paradigm in Asset Strategy Man - Reliabilityweb: A Culture of Reliability

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No More Spreadsheets: The New Paradigm in Asset Strategy Management by Amir Datoo

Microsoft Excel® is an amazing tool. Yet, it has its limitations and flaws for engineers who aren't trained in computer programming.

The main problem with spreadsheets for managing maintenance programs is human error. No matter how fastidious you are when creating a spreadsheet, a single line of data that is entered incorrectly, or worse, an inaccurate user-defined formula, can have huge implications down the road.

In fact, "What We Know About Spreadsheet Errors," a study by Raymond Panko of the University of Hawaii's College of Business Administration that was published in the Journal of End User Computing, found that 88 percent of spreadsheets contain errors. He warns:

These error rates are completely consistent with error rates found in other human activities. With such high cell error rates, most large spreadsheets will have multiple errors, and even relatively small 'scratchpad' spreadsheets will have a significant probability of error.

When it comes to maintenance, these small errors can add up quickly.

Think of a multimillion dollar maintenance project. A maintenance manager unwittingly enters a few incorrect cost estimates. Decisions are made based on the calculations resulting from this incorrect data and, as a result, machinery is not maintained when it should be.

Or, the equation for failure probability is not quite right. According to the spreadsheet, a major piece of equipment isn't likely to fail anytime soon, so you delay maintenance. Whoops. The equipment fails and the whole plant needs to shut down. The downtime costs tens of thousands of dollars a day.

Yes, Excel can be used to create links between different sheets, develop hierarchical relations and create simple pivots. It can even run complex Monte Carlo simulations for determining probabilistic likelihoods of asset failure. It's flexible and easily adaptable. But, can your organization afford the risk of compounding errors due to incorrectly entered data or a flawed formula?

"Implementing an Asset Strategy Management (ASM) solution removes the inconsistent outcomes from asset strategies and drives continuous reliability improvement."

Making Sense of Work Management

As any maintenance engineer or manager knows, work management is a critical piece of the maintenance puzzle. It's all about evaluating your equipment, deciding what you need to do with it, scheduling the work, completing the work and, finally, reviewing your actions.

You'd be hard-pressed to find an organization that doesn't have a good work management process in place. Additionally, a raft of enterprise software systems exist to help manage the activity.

Yet, these enterprise systems fall short in one crucial area: Asset Strategy Management. Reliability analysis is not built into the tools, so organizations fall back on spreadsheets to manage things like predictive failure analysis, failure mode and effects analysis and reliability simulations.

The good news? Implementing an Asset Strategy Management (ASM) solution removes the inconsistent outcomes from asset strategies and drives continuous reliability improvement. ASM helps to answer the "what" and "when" of maintenance and is proving to save money, dodge downtime and improve overall business performance.

Key Benefits of Asset Strategy Management

The use of an enterprise ASM solution over spreadsheets offers huge value to any organization.

First, as a structured solution, you know it has gone through rigorous rounds of testing by experienced programmers. Formula errors simply don't exist.

What about human error? An ASM solution helps you avoid user input errors through data validation and verification. You set up business rules and logic that immediately flag any errors that have been made. For example, there's a common field called system condition. You can set the field as mandatory, meaning a user must enter a number to progress to the next field. You can even stipulate what number(s) it can be.

ASM also delivers huge efficiency gains. With spreadsheets, it can take almost three years to develop a reliability management strategy. But, using an enterprise ASM software tool, complex reliability strategies for that same organization can be up and running in six months.

Efficiency is also found in a reduction of files being used. If you're using spreadsheets to manage maintenance schedules, it's common to have a different spreadsheet at each site. A change that needs to be deployed globally requires a huge effort and carries a risk for errors. When data is consolidated into one ASM system, changes can be made singularly and globally.

Reliability studies also seamlessly interact with the computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) without version issues and/or loss of data.

Perhaps the most significant benefit of an ASM solution is its ability to facilitate risk-based decision-making. Spreadsheets do no provide real-time analytics to guide informed decisions. But, with the right ASM system in place, all the key metrics you need to make those business-critical decisions that could make or break your business are at your fingertips.

In Summary

If you are currently trying to manage your asset strategies in spreadsheets as your enterprise tool, you may already be experiencing challenges with collaboration and large data storage. You may have also experienced the effects of errors that can exist within these systems or, perhaps, you don't have visibility into where errors are lurking or how significant they are. Errors can potentially lead to poor decision-making, compromising equipment availability and reliability, or worse still unknown exposure to critical risk. As an alternative, consider increasing reliability and decreasing downtime costs by using a software solution that is fit for purpose and can handle the needs of a collaborative, enterprise level organization.


Author headshot

Amir Datoo

Amir Datoo, CRL, CMRP, is a Technical Manager at ARMS Reliability. He is involved in the development of enterprise asset strategy management software and associated reliability and implementation software, as well as provides technical support and governance for reliability projects. www.armsreliability.com



~A.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Former NASA Astronaut: Companies Could Need to Run the ISS, or Let It Crash in 2024

Former NASA Astronaut: Companies Could Need to Run the ISS, or Let It Crash in 2024

Former NASA Astronaut: Companies Could Need to Run the ISS, or Let It Crash in 2024

Astronaut Michael Foale wants to find a way to save the International Space Station.

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For almost two decades, the International Space Station (ISS) has been a shining example of international cooperation in the name of scientific research. But a former astronaut warns that the space station, which has been continually inhabited since November 2, 2000, could be abandoned and deorbited if additional funding for the mission is not found.

A veteran of six space missions, veteran NASA astronaut Michael Foale has spent over a year in space, living on both the Soviet/Russian Mir space station and the ISS. In a recent interview with the BBC, Foale expressed concerns about the current plan to deorbit the ISS in 2024, sending it to disintegrate over the Pacific Ocean.

"Year by year, Russia is launching the fuel to fill up the tanks of the ISS service module to enable the space station to be deorbited," Foale said to the BBC. "That's the current plan–I think it's a bad plan, a massive waste of a fantastic resource."

Various other space exploration missions seem to have taken precedence over the ISS. President Trump signed a directive for NASA to send "American astronauts back to the moon, and eventually Mars." To fulfill these goals, NASA plans to construct a space station in orbit near the moon known as the Deep Space Gateway, a project that will require much of the agency's annual budget. NASA is also still working on the enormous and expensive Space Launch System rocket. In addition, the Russian space agency Roscosmos, which works closely with NASA on the ISS, has been plagued by a series of launch failures, corruption cases, and mismanaged projects that have left the Russian space program with serious budgetary concerns.

Whether NASA and Roscosmos will be in a position to continue supporting the ISS in 2024 is up in the air. If they will not or can not, however, Foale has a suggestion.

"I'm hoping that commercial space can come up with a business plan that allows part of the ISS to be maintained in space, without sinking it into the Pacific Ocean," Foale told the BBC. "You have to come up with innovative ways of keeping it in space."

Foale, who now works in electric aviation, sees a possibility for the ISS to expand its current private research program. Space tourism programs could also be considered to help fund the station, such as Russia's plan to build a luxury hotel on the ISS and charge wealthy patrons tens of millions for a trip to the space station. Perhaps in six years, when the government funding runs out, the station could be funded by private scientific interests, space tourists, and telecoms companies that could make use of the six-person station.

As it currently floats above the Earth, the ISS is a monument to human ingenuity and the spirit of cooperation. As its death day in 2024 draws closer, it's possible that national space agencies approve funding to keep the station running longer. If not, perhaps private companies will find a way to keep the $100 billion space station safely orbiting the Earth.

Should neither of these things occur, the International Space Station will likely burn up and crash over the Pacific Ocean in six years.

Source: BBC



~A.

Monday, January 08, 2018

Recipes Archives | A Healthy Leaf: Your Source for Moringa Capsules, Powder, Tea, Seeds and More!

Recipes Archives | A Healthy Leaf: Your Source for Moringa Capsules, Powder, Tea, Seeds and More!

Chocolate Coconut Banana Bread with Moringa

Category: Recipes

Chocolate Coconut Banana Bread with MoringaChocolate Coconut Banana Bread with Moringa Mmm…Amazing.  The smell of Chocolate Coconut Banana Bread is wafting through my house as it cools in the kitchen. Our very ripe bananas desperately needed to find a comfortable resting place, and this Chocolate Coconut Banana Bread provided the location.  One recipe deliciously uses 4 bananas! I roasted the bananas (and now I wonder…

Basil Moringa Watermelon-Limeade Popsicle

Basil Moringa Watermelon-Limeade PopsicleBasil Moringa Watermelon-Limeade Popsicle Moringatasticly Refreshing!  What screams freshness and summertime more than zesty limes, fresh basil, and ripe "some-kind-of good" watermelon? How about these 3 ingredients blended together and put on a stick?! Mix in some Moringa and pinch in some salt (pink himalayan) and sit back and relax.  I can already hear those precious summertime sounds: the squeals…


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Kitchen Organization Superheroes to the Rescue

Kitchen Organization Superheroes to the Rescue

Kitchen Organization Superheroes to the Rescue

Kitchen by The Home Depot

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Your Lower Cabinets Are Overcrowded

Cabinets so crammed that you need Ant-Man to help you find that last jar of tomato sauce? It's time to take action. Maximize your lower cabinetry space with a combination of large rollout trays, side rollouts and wire door racks. Rollouts pack a punch, helping you reach the back of the cabinets in a flash — no more aching knees and strained back just to find the right canned soup. Add a toe-kick drawer underneath for even more storage.

This setup isn't just for food. Use it to create a kid zone to store juice boxes and craft supplies, or as a pet zone — put food, toys and leashes up top and stash food and water bowls in the toe-kick drawer. If your corner cabinets are giving you grief, install a Lazy Susan to easily access items. Consider corner drawers or pullouts for maximum impact.
Your Upper Cabinets Are Too High

Not all of us have a Clark Kent to fly us to our top cabinet shelves, but never fear — your kitchen caped crusader might just be masquerading as a pull-down spice rack. Instead of teetering on a stool, hunting down a taller family member or simply avoiding the top shelves, you can pull your spices down to eye level. Add this cabinet accessory near your cooking area, such as next to the range, for a space-planning victory. A dedicated spot for your spices makes meal prep more efficient and also keeps your countertops clear.
Your Cutlery Drawers Are Jumbled

Kitchen cutlery drawers are notorious organizational pain points. Standard dividers don't always fit your silverware or your drawers, leaving things a mess. Get organized with a built-in tiered cutlery divider. The additional level provides more storage, so you don't have to stack items
haphazardly. The top level slides back and forth, providing easy access to the lower compartments. Fitted during construction, the divider won't be sliding around every time you open and close the drawer. Try a diagonal divider to hold Hulk-sized utensils.
Your Pots and Pans Are Chaotic

Pots and pans are often shoved into cabinets in disarray, creating an ambush of falling lids the next time someone opens the door. Stop the lawlessness with base pullouts or deep rollout trays. The pullouts seen here operate independently and feature rails for storing lids on the sides. Install yours next to the stovetop or range to grab the right pan in a jiffy.
Your Utensils Are Scattered

Kitchen utensils can be a home chef's kryptonite. The basics just don't seem to cut it when you could have a shiny set of matching knives, three sizes of whisks, four types of spatulas and seemingly endless spoon options. The tricky part is storing everything neatly. A base utensil pantry pullout keeps items in one place and off the counter. Try one with an adjustable knife block and a lower shelf for added convenience. The knife block — made out of flexible fibers — and storage canisters seen here are dishwasher-safe.

Bam! Pow! These cabinet accessories will leave you and your kitchen designer saying, "Mission accomplished."

More: To explore more cabinetry and built-in cabinet accessories, visit The Home Depot's website.

This story was written by the Houzz Sponsored Content team.


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For sale: Mahtomedi cottage where architect Edwin Lundie lived and worked – Twin Cities

For sale: Mahtomedi cottage where architect Edwin Lundie lived and worked – Twin Cities

For sale: Mahtomedi cottage where architect Edwin Lundie lived and worked

  • Architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, is for sale. Lundie worked under famed architect Cass Gilbert. Lundie didn't design this home, but his touches can be found throughout. (Courtesy of Planomatic)

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Architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, is for sale. Lundie worked under famed architect Cass Gilbert. Lundie didn't design this home, but his touches can be found throughout. (Courtesy of Planomatic)

Lamese McDowell sighs as she looks around her vintage Mahtomedi cottage. With its walnut-stained hardwood floors, its Versailles-reproduction wallpaper and its antique glass windows, it almost feels as if McDowell is seated inside an exquisite jewelry box that an artisan crafted more than a century ago.

In a way, she is: This cottage, built in 1910, was the longtime residence of Edwin Lundie, the late architect whose body of work includes the lodge at Lutsen, various buildings and structures at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and many private homes — including 17 Scandinavian-designed timber cabins at the North Shore. Although he didn't build this home in Mahtomedi, he modified it with his traditional finishes, flourishes and trims.

McDowell sees herself as caretaker for the place that a Minnesota great called home. So, even though there is a "for sale" sign in the front yard, the idea of actually letting go is difficult for this widow.

"I really don't want to sell it," said McDowell, "but I feel like it's time."

But time is passing as she waits for a buyer. The two-bedroom, two-bath house, currently priced at $399,000, has been on the market for more than two months.

"I want to find someone who is going to love it," McDowell says. "To me, it's a very special and unique and unusual home. I picture someone buying it who appreciates architecture and history, who appreciates something unique that is handmade."

EDWIN LUNDIE'S LIFE

Peter O'Toole is someone who "appreciates something unique and handmade" — he lives in a Lundie house in St. Paul and is the author of the sumptuous art and history book "Edwin H. Lundie — Five Decades — A Journey of Art & Architecture" (Artist Book Press, 2016).

"It's a gem," O'Toole says of the Mahtomedi cottage, which is featured in his book.

While researching Lundie, O'Toole spent many hours at the Northwest Architectural Archives at the University of Minnesota, the keeper of Lundie's papers, including his drawings and blueprints and other materials from his life's work. It was there that O'Toole began mapping out the story of Lundie's life.

Lundie was born in 1886: It was the year that Cocoa Cola was introduced to the world. It was the year that the Statue of Liberty, finally assembled, was dedicated. Grover Cleveland was president; Emily Dickinson died; it was the debut of the St. Paul Winter Carnival.

Edwin Lundie, architect who worked under Cass Gilbert, circa 1931.
Edwin Lundie, architect who worked under Cass Gilbert, circa 1931.

Although Lundie was a native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, his family later moved to Salem, S.D., where he attended high school. He didn't stay.

"He was a teenager when he left Salem, setting out to St. Paul to be an architect," O'Toole says.

Back then — believed to be 1904 — there was not yet a formal school of architecture in Minnesota for this artistic young man to attend, but it didn't matter. Lundie received a superior education in the Endicott building in downtown St. Paul, where he settled in as a student draftsman in the St. Paul office of Cass Gilbert. Gilbert was America's first "celebrity" architect, designer of buildings like the Minnesota state Capitol in St. Paul, the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., and the Woolworth Building in New York (the tallest building in the world when it was completed in 1912).

Several years later, after Gilbert closed his St. Paul office to focus exclusively on his New York base, Lundie began working for Gilbert's colleague, architect Thomas Holyoke: "I was there for eight years," Lundie told the Pioneer Press in a 1969 interview, "but I would not yet have called myself an architect."

Lundie's extensive study and training continued when he was invited to work for yet another celebrity architect in the Endicott building: Emmanuel L. Masqueray, the French architect behind both the St. Paul Cathedral and the Basilica of St. Mary — as well as many other places.

"Emmanuel Masqueray ran a very busy office with a very heavy workload," O'Toole says.

It was good fit for Lundie, who was a bit of a workaholic.

"He kept a drafting table in his bedroom," O'Toole says.

The studio at architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Keller Williams Realty)
The studio at architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Planomatic)

Eventually, Lundie "graduated" into his own practice, which included many well-to-do clients in and around St. Paul. This was after the Summit Avenue housing boom, however, and it might be one reason why Lundie's name is not as familiar.

"Lundie came along the generation after the lumber barons' homes were built," O'Toole says. "It was post-World War I; people were more interested in smaller homes — it was the birth of the Arts and Crafts era. People were interested in homes with an intimate scale and craftmanship."

Perhaps this is why Lundie's work speaks to today's generation: One could see Lundie feeling at home with the tiny house movement, with his attention to every detail; his use of natural and locally sourced materials; his collaboration with local artisans and designers.

"Because of his efficient floor plans, he was a precursor to Sarah Susanka's idea of the 'Not-So-Big House,' " O'Toole says.

In 1969, while Modernist architect Ralph Rapson was heading up the University of Minnesota School of Architecture, Lundie talked to the Pioneer Press about his quieter, more traditional style, a style reminiscent of European cottages and country houses, as well as strong Scandinavian influences.

The living room at architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Keller Williams Realty)
The living room at architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Planomatic)

"In his office today," the Pioneer Press wrote, "he has a huge carved wooden chest which was given him by Masqueray. His office, hung with the renderings of his houses, is pure Lundie. There are samples of Dutch blue tile on his table-desk and a mantel piece carved in wood on the wall behind his chair.

"The workroom is the second one of the suite," the story continues. "There, Lundie takes off his coat, rolls up his sleeves and goes to work with a pencil he sharpens with sandpaper rather than a mechanical sharpener. The pencil drawings in such fine detail that they might have been done under a magnifying glass. But that is not the case. It is the way Lundie works. The beautiful drawings of his houses — complete with stables, guest houses and gate houses — are a record of the joys of his life."

EDWIN LUNDIE'S HOME

"The joys of his life" included his own home and hearth in Mahtomedi.

"The house was apparently purchased as a wedding gift for Lundie and his wife by his in-laws," says Gayle Meador, a Keller Williams agent who is co-listing the property with her colleague, Sally Bradford, who has a personal connection with the Lundies.

"I was a neighbor of theirs," Bradford says. "I lived there when they did. It was so cute, when Mr. Lundie was on his way home from work, Mrs. Lundie would come down to the garage ahead of time and open the door and wait for him, so he could just pull in with his Ford Thunderbird."

Although the house is not a Lundie original, the garage is.

The garage at architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Keller Williams Realty)
The garage at architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Planomatic)

"He designed and built the garage," O'Toole says.

The single-stall garage, covered in wood siding painted red and white to match the house, is accessed via a set of elegant carriage doors. It looks more like an upscale shed or perhaps an artist's studio — it is only missing the cupola that Lundie originally designed to adorn its roof. For Lundie, this garage was an important form of shelter.

"Some people say his only luxury was his 1958 Ford Thunderbird," O'Toole says.

It's unclear how many luxuries Lundie could afford. He was a working architect who coveted the respect of his peers, but he was not a celebrity like Cass Gilbert or Frank Lloyd Wright. His star has been rising posthumously, though, especially after another Minnesota architect — "cabinologist" Dale Mulfinger of SALA Architects —  wrote a book, "The Architecture of Edwin Lundie" (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1995), that explored and celebrated Lundie's legacy, something that Lundie never really did for himself.

"He didn't seem to seek fame," Mulfinger says.

Instead, Lundie's world seemed to revolve around work and his family (especially work). The Lundies, who were married in 1917, had one child, Ellen, born in 1920.

When Lundie wasn't meeting with clients at his house — he had more than 30 commissions in the area for remodels as well as new builds — the family's home life was full of simple pleasures: a porch, two wood-burning fireplaces, a charming garden, a swim at the lake across the way. When they wanted to get away, the Lundies headed to their cabin on the North Shore of Lake Superior — the only place that Lundie ever designed and built for himself and his own family (and not his Thunderbird).

EDWIN LUNDIE'S LEGACY 

Grace Lundie died in 1968 at the age of 76. After her death, Lundie sold their home and moved back to the city, to the St. Paul Athletic Club. He passed away a few years later, in 1972. He was 85.

The couple who bought the home from Lundie didn't live there long: Instead, they sold it in 1971 to Fred McDowell, an artist.

"He loved it from the minute he saw it," Lamese says. "Both of us did; neither of us would have lived anywhere else."

Lamese, who is also an artist, moved into the home after she and Fred were married in 1977.

Together, the couple spent a lifetime asking themselves: "What would Lundie do?" before embarking on any changes or updates to the house (as well as consulting with the Lundies' daughter, who passed away in 2000 at 79).

Mulfinger applauds the McDowells.

The fireplace in the master bedroom of architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Keller Williams Realty)
The fireplace in the master bedroom of architect Ewin Lundie's former home at 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, which is for sale. (Courtesy of Planomatic)

"Some of the items which Lundie designed — such as the fireplace in the bedroom and some of the trim characteristics — are significant," he says, "but equally significant is how the McDowells, upon buying the house, have improved or altered it to make it feel more Lundie than when Lundie himself lived there. And I think that's very significant — it says something about the influence of someone's work going beyond that person's own life. And the McDowells are extremely proud of their place — they have treasured it.

"Is it a significant house in his body of work? No, but at times there is a distinction between where someone lived and what someone did."

Lundie lived simply, Mulfinger points out.

"I think it's equally significant that it's a very modest house," Mulfinger says. "His work spans some beautiful mansions and country houses down to some intimate cabins and very small houses — and even his big houses seem like assemblages of small spaces. I think this house shows where his heart was; this was where his heart was. He was not a man who needed luxury in his life."

Lundie might have agreed. In his research, O'Toole unearthed this quote:

"I have had a wonderful life," Lundie said. "I have done just what I wanted to do."

EDWIN LUNDIE'S STEWARDS 

Lamese McDowell sighs again as she sits in the parlor of the little jewel box of a house on Mahtomedi Avenue.

"If I could move this house to where I want to be, I would," she says.

McDowell's husband, Fred, passed away in 2014; just like Lundie, the widow wants to move closer into the city now — closer to her relatives and her church.

The shutters at architect Ewin Lundie's former home, 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, contain the finial Lundie designed. The house is for sale. (Courtesy of Keller Williams Realty)
The shutters at architect Ewin Lundie's former home, 1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi, contain the finial Lundie designed. The house is for sale.<br />(Courtesy of Planomatic)

On a tour of the home, she points out its details — the first-floor den with its wall of built-in cabinetry (and its exquisite hinges); the free-standing mirror that Lundie left behind; a custom door. She sounds like a docent at a museum. She kind of is, says her real-estate agent.

"Lamese and Fred have been wonderful stewards of this house — they only brought in the best people to do any type of work, and even some people who worked with Lundie," Meador says. "What we are looking for is really another steward for this house."

1823 Mahtomedi Ave., Mahtomedi

This Mahtomedi cottage was the personal residence of Edwin Lundie (1886-1972), a St. Paul architect who got his start as a student draftsman in architect Cass Gilbert's St. Paul office and whose own notable work includes the main lodge at Lusten, 17 cabins on the North Shore of Lake Superior and many remodels and construction of private residences of the well-to-do, with last names like Dayton, MacMillan, Weyerhaeuser and Griggs. Although Lundie did not design this house, he did work on it through the years — including adding a fireplace in his bedroom and (probably) the exterior shutters and garden gate, as well as building a garage in the back (his blueprints have survived). The home is on a terraced and wooded lot that shares access to White Bear Lake across the street.

  • Price: $399,000
  • Year built: 1910
  • Square feet: 1,392
  • Bedrooms: Two (plus den)
  • Bathrooms: Full (main floor); three-quarters (second floor)
  • Basement: Walkout
  • Heating: Forced air
  • Cooling: Central air
  • Garage: Detached, single stall
  • Lot size: 0.28 acres
  • Waterfront: Property includes access to White Bear Lake.

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Sunday, January 07, 2018

13 Bizarre Things That Every Connecticuter Will Find In Their Junk Drawer

13 Bizarre Things That Every Connecticuter Will Find In Their Junk Drawer

13 Bizarre Things That Every Connecticuter Will Find In Their Junk Drawer

1. Roll of Film

This is almost vintage, left over from the days before digital. The roll of film is undeveloped and what could be lurking inside? Is it the pictures of a slightly drunk Dan dancing at Aunt Carol's wedding? Or could it be those scenic shots of your kid's reptile themed birthday party? Shall it remain a secret or do you dare develop what's inside there?

2. Canadian Money

They look like quarters and pennies, but they're not! This Canadian currency finds its way into our pockets and our junk drawers where it remains forever unspent.

3. Flip Phone

So you saved that old flip phone from years ago just in case your iPhone fell in the toilet and you might have to get that one reactivated. Really? Just throw that thing out, you're never going back to it!

4. Oyster Crackers

Every darn clam shack and seafood stand in Connecticut gives them out, but we don't put them in our clam chowder. And quite frankly, they don't really taste very good at all.

5. Raffle Ticket

The raffle ticket that you bought at the Big E or was it the Durham Fair last year or maybe three years ago. It was for a chance to win a big screen t.v. or maybe a wii game system. Oh wait - you got it at the convenience store back in 2012, where you had to guess how many jelly beans were in the jar to win the jar! I wonder if you won?

6. Dice & Marbles

Stray pieces from some long forgotten game, these things rattle around in the junk drawer just waiting for a second chance. Who knows when you might need them again?

7. Lobster Crackers & Beer Bottle Openers

Does one exist without the other? Not in Connecticut. These are tools of the trade for everyone who loves a seriously succulent lobster dinner with beer on the side.

8. Dunkin' Donuts Gift Card

Its just lingering around. That $10 Dunkin' Donuts gift card that the neighbor gave you five years ago for the holidays. Check the balance and it has 47 cents left. We all know there's a D&D right down the road, but you're never gonna use whats left on that gift card!

9. Beer Pong Ball

You may not want to admit it, but you just might have one of these rolling around in your junk drawer. Whether its yellow or white, this ball is ready and waiting for a competitive game of beer pong!

10. Allen Key

Since the arrival of the almighty IKEA in the state of Connecticut, there is sure to be one of these tools lingering around in your junk drawer.

11. Calculator

Not a fun item in the junk drawer, but it is there nonetheless. Tax season is almost upon us and this handy device will be getting a workout.

12. Clam Knives

In a state that loves their seafood, you are bound to have a clam knife or two floating around. Or maybe its an Exacto knife that lurks in that drawer.

13. Take Out Menus

In Connecticut, we love to order out and that plethora of menus ends up in the junk drawer. Pizza, Chinese, deli, sushi - you name it, we are all ready to pull the trigger when it comes to ordering take out.



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